Therapeutic Protein

Technically, any protein-based drug is a “therapeutic protein,” but the term was first used to describe medicines that are genetically engineered versions of naturally occurring human proteins.

A protein is a large molecule comprised of a long chain of amino acids that is folded into a three-dimensional shape. The specific amino acid sequence and 3-D shape determines the biological function of the protein.

Therapeutic proteins can be used to replace a protein that is abnormal or deficient in a particular disease. They can also augment the body’s supply of a beneficial protein to help reduce the impact of disease or chemotherapy. Genetically engineered proteins can closely resemble the natural proteins they replace, or they can be enhanced by adding sugars or other molecules that extend the protein’s duration of activity.

The term therapeutic protein was first used to describe medicines that are genetically engineered versions of naturally occurring human proteins. The complex structure of proteins can be represented in several different ways to help scientists study larger or smaller details of the molecule.

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